Pan-Roasted Corn and Tomato Salad

In honor of “tomato and corn month” here in Vermont, we thought we’d share this simple and delicious seasonal recipe from the WFM archives.

Dana Crowl (Patrick’s mom) found this recipe in the New York Times in August of 2009. We gave it the WFM stamp of approval and posted it on an earlier version of this blog. Everyone loved it. Ten years later we’re re-sharing it with you here. Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • ¼ pound bacon, chopped
  • 1 small red onion, chopped
  • 4 to 6 ears corn, stripped of their kernels (2 to 3 cups)
  • Juice of 1 lime, or more to taste
  • 2 cups cored and chopped tomatoes
  • 1 medium ripe avocado, pitted, peeled and chopped
  • 2 fresh small chilies, like Thai, seeded and minced
  • Salt and black pepper
  • ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro, more or less

What to do

Cook bacon in a large skillet over medium-high heat until it begins to render fat; add onion and cook until just softened, about 5 minutes, then add corn. Continue cooking, stirring or shaking pan occasionally, until corn begins to brown a bit, about 5 more minutes; remove from heat and let cool for a few minutes. Drain fat if you wish.

Put lime juice in a large bowl and add bacon-corn mixture; then toss with remaining ingredients. Taste, adjust the seasoning and serve warm or at room temperature.

Yield: 4 Servings

Published in the New York Times on August 19, 2009.

Brave Coffee & Tea: 10 Years and Going Strong

Hand-roasted, small-batch coffee.

Scott Weigand, owner and coffee roaster, hard at work.

“I love roasting coffee because it gives me a chance to be creative while crafting something everyone loves!” ~ Scott Weigand

Location: Waterbury, Vermont

Distance from Market: Less than a mile from our Waterbury store

We love our Waterbury neighbors! Brave Coffee & Tea is a family-owned coffee-roasting company and tea purveyor located in Waterbury, Vermont, right down the road from our new location. They hand roast their beans four days per week, so orders arrive within 2-5 days of roasting. And this year they celebrate their 10th anniversary, which isn’t an easy feat in today’s competitive marketplace.

The company was founded by Chris and Heidi Townsend in 2009. Chrisa bit of a “mad scientist” and serious coffee loverstarted roasting beans in the back of the couple’s coffeeshop, Black Cap Coffee, on Main Street in Stowe, Vermont. He did what they said couldn’t be done, and designed and built his own roaster from scratch.

Scott Weigand, who had been serving and selling coffee for many years, learned the tricks of the coffee-roasting trade under Chris’s tutelage. In 2014, Scott took over the business and has been growing it ever since.

Why We Love Them: This is the story of a specialty coffee company that beat the odds. With a few large-scale roasters in the neighborhood, Brave has managed to attract a loyal following of devout coffee lovers who appreciate the quality and consistency of hand-roasted coffee. (When you’re roasting in small batches, the amount of time between roasting and packaging is greatly reduced, resulting in a fresher, more flavorful brew.)

One of their customer reviews says it best: “The roasts are distinctive, the beans are fresh, and the result is delicious.” We couldn’t agree more.


Local Food Is Love is our summer celebration of the amazing things coming out of our neighbors’ farms and kitchens this time of year (and the people who make it happen). Every week this summer we’re spotlighting local farms and producers—and the good food (+nourishment and joy) they bring to our lives. Click here to read more stories about our local growers and producers.

 

 

The Vermont Spätzle Company: Gluten-Free and Delicious

Gluten-free spaetzle made right here in Vermont.

“We have been so fortunate that in the short two years that we have been in business, we have met so many great people and changed so many lives, especially gluten-free people. We love spreading the Spätzle Love.”
~ Julz and Marty

Location: Arlington, Vermont

Distance from the Market: 67 miles

This is the only company in the world that makes and sells gluten-free spätzle. And they’re based right here in Vermont.

Co-founder Marty Irion was born in Erlangen, Germany, and grew up eating the traditional spätzle made with wheat flour and eggs. After he married Julz (who loves to cook), she began making spätzle for Marty and their two children.

All this spätzle-eating came to a screeching halt when the Irions needed to go gluten-free. Julz spent seven years experimenting with different recipes until she finally hit the jackpot: a delicious gluten-free version of the German culinary staple. Lucky for us, in 2017 they began packaging and selling their unique and delicious product as “Vermont Spätzle Company.”

by The Vermont Spatzle Company

Why We Love It: We admire anyone who’s willing to spend years perfecting a recipe. So we’re particularly impressed with Julz’s stick-to-itiveness. After all of that hard work, she nailed it with this delicious gluten-free version of a family favorite.

Plus, spätzle is super versatileyou can enjoy it plain with butter or combine it with veggies and cheese. Since spätzle is pan-fried, it doesn’t get mushy when cooked, like many gluten-free pastas.


Local Food Is Love is our summer celebration of the amazing things coming out of our neighbors’ farms and kitchens this time of year (and the people who make it happen). Every week this summer we’re spotlighting local farms and producers—and the good food (+nourishment and joy) they bring to our lives. Click here to read more stories about our local growers and producers.

Blue Moon Sorbet: Fruit, Cane Sugar, and Juice

Fruit is the first ingredient.

 

by Blue Moon Sorbet

“We use less sugar because only the freshest, highest-quality fruits, purees and juices go into our sorbet. There is no added flavoring or coloring — the intense flavor and vivid color comes from the fruit itself.” ~ John Donaldson and Pamela Frantz

Location: Quechee, Vermont
Distance to Market: 10 miles

Blue Moon Sorbets is about as local as you can get. For 10 years co-founder John Donaldson was the pastry chef at the Prince and Pauper Restaurant here in Woodstock. And people loved his sorbet. So, one day, when shopping for sorbet at the grocery store (and not finding any), he decided to bring his tried-and-true technique to the masses.

John and his wife Pamela Frantz launched Blue Moon Sorbet in 1995. Their flavorful sorbets are made with the freshest, highest-quality fruits, purees and juices, with no added flavoring or coloring.

 

Why We Love It: We love this Vermont-based sorbet company because their super-short ingredient list begins with FRUIT! The flavors are intense … and most people have a hard time picking their favorite one. That’s why we carry a few! Pick up a pint or two for the balmy late-summer days ahead.


Local Food Is Love is our summer celebration of the amazing things coming out of our neighbors’ farms and kitchens this time of year (and the people who make it happen). Every week this summer we’re spotlighting local farms and producers—and the good food (+nourishment and joy) they bring to our lives. Click here to read more stories about our local growers and producers.

Former Ski Racers Make a Life on Four Corners Farm

Living the farm life since 1978.

by Bob Gray of Four Corners Farm

“We take great pride in producing the very highest quality fruits and vegetables possible, while at the same time making every effort to take care of the land that is taking care of us.” ~ Bob and Kim Gray

Location: South Newbury, Vermont
Distance from the Market: 49 miles

Four Corners is a family farm in South Newbury, Vermont, with 50 acres of fruit and vegetables, a farm stand, and a small herd of Jersey dairy cows and Scottish Highland beef cows.

In 1978, Kim and Bob Gray, both native Vermonters and former members of the U.S. ski team, began farming a 120-acre parcel. Over the years they purchased neighboring lands, growing the farm to its current size of 225 acres. Today Kim and Bob and their three grown children manage the farm. They grow a wide range of fruits and vegetables, including their locally famous strawberry and tomato crops.

by Bob Gray of Four Corners Farm

Why We Love Them: Bob takes amazing photos. You should check them out. Of course we love Four Corners Farm for their delicious fruit and veggies. But Bob’s photos give us an opportunity to see where this beautiful produce comes from. And we get a glimpse of what farm life entails … quite literally “the view from the seat of the tractor.”

by Bob Gray of Four Corners Farm

Along with images of the bucolic landscape surrounding Four Corners Farm, a few “cute animal” pics, and close-ups of the gorgeous fruit and veggies coming out of the fields (and greenhouse), you’ll also see a few pint-sized farmers. This is a true family farm. The Grays work hard to provide for three generations of their family, while caring for the land and supplying farm-fresh produce to their community and the rest of us who are lucky enough to get a once-a-week delivery.

This article on VtDigger is a few years old, but the story hasn’t changed. It’s well worth the read.

For more info: 4cornersfarm.com.


Local Food Is Love is our summer celebration of the amazing things coming out of our neighbors’ farms and kitchens this time of year (and the people who make it happen). Every week this summer we’re spotlighting local farms and producers—and the good food (+nourishment and joy) they bring to our lives. Click here to read more stories about our local growers and producers.

Seared Sea Scallops with Lemongrass Sauce and Basil, Mint & Cilantro Salad

It’s scallop season in New England! Our scallops arrive weekly from Massachusetts … so you know they’re fresh and delicious! Here’s one of our favorite Asian-inspired recipes that takes advantage of fresh herbs coming out of the garden this time of year. Enjoy!

Sauce:
2 tsp canola oil
1 onion, chopped
6 stalks lemongrass, outer leaves removed, stems pounded, cut in 3” lengths
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
3 Serrano peppers (or more for added spice!), finely chopped
2 c dry white wine
1 28-oz can whole tomatoes, plus juice

Salad:
½ cup basil
½ cup fresh mint
½ cup cilantro
Juice from ½ lime
2 tsp canola oil

Scallops:
24 jumbo sea scallops (or more if they’re medium-sized)
1 Tbsp canola oil

For Sauce: Heat oil in a large pan over low heat. Cook onion with a pinch of salt until translucent. Stir in lemongrass, garlic and chilies, and add wine. Raise heat to high, then simmer 5 minutes. Add tomatoes and juice, and break apart the tomatoes. Simmer until the sauce thickens, about 20 minutes. Force sauce through colander and discard solids. Season with salt and pepper.

For Salad: Toss all ingredients in a bowl; season with salt and pepper.

For Scallops: Season with salt and pepper. Heat a large non-stick pan over high heat with the oil. When oil is hot add 8 scallops. Cook for 1 minute, reduce heat to medium high, and cook, undisturbed, until golden, about 4 minutes. Turn scallops over, cook 3 minutes more. Remove from heat. Repeat in 2 batches with remaining scallops.

Divide scallops and sauce among 4 bowls, and top with salad.

Serves 4.

Walpole Creamery: From Cow to Cone in Walpole, NH

Made with organic milk from their neighbor’s farm.

 

Location: Walpole, NH
Distance from the Market: 45 miles

Walpole Creamery is one of the few ice-cream makers in the country that can truly call their ice cream super premium and all-natural. Their ice cream is over 16% milk fat with 30% overrun (which means it’s more dense, less airy) and meets the non-GMO standards set by the State of Vermont.

“Our award-winning ice-cream starts with local fresh milk from Crescent Farm, located three miles down the road in Walpole, New Hampshire,” they explain on their website. “Together we are trying to create an ice-cream that is a throwback to an era when each batch of ice cream was made the same day from fresh all-natural ingredients.”

Last summer Jon Megas-Russell at the Brattleboro Co-op posted a really interesting article about Walpole Creamery. If you’d like to learn more about their ice-cream making process, from cow to cone, we recommend checking it out.

Why We Love It: Unlike many “homemade” ice-cream companies, Walpole Creamery makes their base mix from scratch, using local, hormone-free and antibiotic-free milk and cream, real cane sugar, and other all-natural ingredients that are locally sourced whenever possible.

We’re also proud to support a veteran-owned company. Owner Rob Kasper was in the Navy for 30 years, and many of his employees also served our country as members of the military.

Rob (pictured here) demonstrates a high level of ethics and integrity in the way he runs his business. This is the kind of company we like to support.

According to Megas Russell’s article, Walpole consistently scores 100 on their health inspection, and Bobby, the plant manager, is committed to zero accidents and zero product loss in his facility. He also pays his suppliers fairly. For example, Walpole Creamery pays Crescent Farm twice as much for their milk as they’d receive from other producers.

Plus, their ice-cream is just plain delicious. Our customers think so, too, which is why it’s one of our top sellers.

To learn more: walpolecreamery.com.


Local Food Is Love is our summer celebration of the amazing things coming out of our neighbors’ farms and kitchens this time of year (and the people who make it happen). Every week this summer we’re spotlighting local farms and producers—and the good food (+nourishment and joy) they bring to our lives. Click here to read more stories about our local growers and producers.

Beyond Ratatouille: Summer Veggie Samosas

We’re making the most of our garden-fresh veggies. This week we received deliveries of zucchini, summer squash, and eggplant from local farms. Here’s one of our favorite vegetarian summer recipes that takes advantage of the mid- to late-summer harvest.

Ingredients

2 Green Peppers
2 Red Peppers
1 Yellow Squash
1 Zucchini
1 Medium Eggplant
2 Medium Onions
2 TBS Finely Chopped Ginger
2 TBS Fresh Chopped Garlic
½ tsp Turmeric
½ tsp Garam Masala
¼ tsp Nutmeg
½ tsp Paprika
¼ cup Freshly Chopped Cilantro
2 TBS Butter or Ghee
Salt & Pepper to Taste

Egg Wash (two beaten eggs with a TBS of water)
Puff Pastry

What to Do

Dice peppers, squash, zucchini, eggplant, and onion into a small dice (1/4 inch). Melt butter into a hot sautee pan. Making sure not to let butter brown. Add onions to pan and cook until soft and translucent. Add the remaining vegetables and cook until tender. Add salt and pepper to taste. Add turmeric, garam masala, nutmeg, and paprika. Cook for another minute or two or until spices become aromatic. Remove cooked vegetables from pan and let cool in the fridge.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. While vegetables are cooling, roll out puff pastry and cut into 3.5-4 inch squares. Once vegetables are cooled, toss in fresh chopped cilantro. Place 3 tablespoons of vegetable mixture in the center of each puff pastry square. Brush egg wash around the edge of puff pastry. Fold corners together to form a triangle and fork edges.

Bake on a greased cookie sheet for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown.

Yields 15-20

Carrier Roasting: They Taste Every Batch of Coffee They Roast

Delivering coffee beans from around the globe.

“To ensure the quality of your cup and the refinement of our craft we taste every single batch we roast.” ~ Carrier Roasting partners Ross Evans, Scott Kerner, and Matt Borg

Location: Northfield, Vermont

Distance from Market: 46 miles

Carrier Roasting Company is a small-batch Vermont roaster who cares deeply about the origin of their coffee beans. They work closely with their importing partners and producers to develop long-term, sustainable, and mutually beneficial relationships.

The company is named after the Carrier Pigeon, a bird that delivers messages home from faraway places. This is how Carrier Coffees team members see themselves: They bring high-quality coffee beans, and their unique stories and tastes, from distant lands to your cup. They also believe in the importance of maintaining the integrity of the bean’s flavor (and its unique birthplace) by not over-, under-, or uneven roasting.

Why We Love Them: We know it’s in the headline, but just to restate an important point: They taste every single batch of coffee they roast. The owners of Carrier Roasting Company score high on the “care factor.” As coffee lovers, we  appreciate their meticulous approach to the entire process, from sourcing to roasting to brewing.

Give it a try and let us know what you think. For the month of August, all 16-ounce bags of Carrier coffee are 10 percent off.

For more info: carrierroasting.com.


Local Food Is Love is our summer celebration of the amazing things coming out of our neighbors’ farms and kitchens this time of year (and the people who make it happen). Every week this summer we’ll spotlight local farms and producers—and the good food (+nourishment and joy) they bring to our lives. Click here to read more stories about our local growers and producers.

 

What’s the Deal with Canned Wine?

A few years ago we carried only two brands of canned wine at the Market. This summer we have an entire display. Sales of canned wine have exploded in recent years. And they’re not just “cheap wines.” A number of reputable winemakers have jumped on the bandwagon. So what’s the deal? Why drink canned wine?

Here are a few good reasons (you might not have considered):

You can bring it to the beach or poolside.

No more sipping wine from a water bottle. Glass is prohibited at most public beaches and pools (even the grandparents have their rules). That’s why canned wine is perfect. You can stick it in a cooler right next to the beer, and you don’t even need to bring plastic cups along.

Cans chill down faster than glass.

Stick a can of wine in some ice and it’ll chill down in less than 10 minutes. And since you’ll find coolers in most places canned wine likes to travel—its portability makes canned wine a popular choice for camping, hiking, festivals, and other outings—you needn’t look far for that ice-cold plunge.

Sometimes you just want one serving.

The FDA defines one serving of wine as 5 ounces. Most wine cans hold about 8-12 ounces, or 1.5 to 2 servings of wine. Perfect for when you just don’t need an entire bottle, or want to practice portion control!

You can put it in a backpack.

Ever tried lugging a bottle of wine up a mountain for a sunset picnic? First of all, you probably don’t need an entire bottle if you’re planning on hiking down.  At one to two servings, cans are just the right size (and much lighter to carry). Plus, they don’t require glasses or a corkscrew.  Just open the can and enjoy.

It won’t explode if shaken (or shatter if you drop it).

We’ve all had this experience. The dreaded beer bomb. Red, white, and pink canned wines aren’t carbonated, so you can shake them all you want … you’re not going to lose half the canand ruin your outfitwhen you open it up. (This rule does not apply to sparkling wines, which are also now available in cans!)

Cans are 100% recyclable.

Even though we throw our glass wine bottles in with the recycling, the truth is, many cities and counties don’t recycle glass, even if they have recycling programs. Recycling centers are able to sell cans for approximately 80 percent more than colored glass. So experts recommend buying cans over glass whenever possible.

Find out for yourself why so many people are switching over to canned wine. Especially during the summer. We have a great selection of canned wines in the front of the store (near the cheese department). Grab a can or two for your next outdoor excursion, and let us know what you think!